Vojvodina

Dél-bánsági körzet
(Hungarian)
Južnobanatski okrug

(Serbian)
Južnobanatski okrug

(Croatian)
Districtul Banatul de Sud
(Romanian)

Northeastern district of Serbia (the Serbian Banat)

Vojvodina, officially is an Autonomous Province located in the northern part of Serbia, in the Pannonian Plain of Central Europe. Its capital and largest city is Novi Sad and its second largest city is Subotica.

District seat with city status: Pančevo. Municipalities: Alibunar, Bela Crkva, Kovačica, Kovin, Opovo, Plandište, Vršac

Geography of Vojvodina

Vojvodina is situated in the northern part of Serbia. The region is divided by the Danube and Tisza rivers into: Bačka in the northwest, Banat in the east and Syrmia (Srem) in the southwest. A small part of the Mačva region is also located in Vojvodina, in the Srem District. Today, the western part of Syrmia is in Croatia, the northern part of Bačka is in Hungary, the eastern part of Banat is in Romania (with a small piece in Hungary), while Baranja (which is between the Danube and the Drava) is in Hungary and Croatia. Vojvodina has a total surface area of 21,500 km2 (8,300 sq mi). Vojvodina is also part of the Danube-Kris-Mures-Tisa euro region.

Most of Vojvodina became part of the Kingdom of Hungary in the 11th century and remained in Hungary until about 900 years later (1918/1920), except for the period of the Ottoman conquest.

Political situation in 1848

Between 1849 and 1860, this region was referred to as Voivodship of Serbia and Tamiš Banat.

          In November 1849, in accordance with a decision made by the Austrian emperor, this Serbian region was transformed into the new Austrian crown land known as Voivodship of Serbia and Tamiš Banat. It consisted of Banat, Bačka, Syrmia, excluding the southern parts of these regions which were part of the Military Frontier. An Austrian governor seated in Temeschwar ruled the area, and the title of voivod belonged to the emperor himself. The full title of the emperor was "Grand Voivod of the Voivodship of Serbia" (German: Großwoiwode der Woiwodschaft Serbien). The province was abolished in 1860, and from 1867 was located again within the Hungarian Kingdom (part of Austria-Hungary). 

1920

          In 1920, the Vojvodina was detached from Hungary and was granted to the Kingdom of Serbia in the Treaty of Trianon, and in 1945 it became part of Yugoslavia.  Vojvodina is situated in the northern part of Serbia. The region is divided by the Danube and Tisza rivers into: Bačka in the northwest, Banat in the east and Syrmia (Srem) in the southwest. A small part of the Mačva region is also located in Vojvodina, in the Srem District. Today, the western part of Syrmia is in Croatia, the northern part of Bačka is in Hungary, the eastern part of Banat is in Romania (with a small piece in Hungary), while Baranja (which is between the Danube and the Drava) is in Hungary and Croatia. Vojvodina is also part of the Danube-Kris-Mures-Tisa euro region.

          At the end of World War I, the Austro-Hungarian Empire collapsed. On 29 October 1918, Syrmia became a part of the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs. On 31 October 1918, the Banat Republic was proclaimed in Temeschwar. The government of Hungary recognized its independence, but it was short-lived.

          In 1920, the region was detached from Hungary and was granted to the Kingdom of Serbia in the Treaty of Trianon, and in 1945 it became part of Yugoslavia.

1921 The Treaty of Trianon & the Dismemberment of the Kingdom of Hungary

          The Treaty of Trianon is the peace treaty concluded at the end of World War I by the Allies of World War I, on one side, and Hungary, seen as a successor of Austria-Hungary, on the other. It established the borders of Hungary and regulated its international situation. Hungary lost over two-thirds of its territory and about two-thirds of its inhabitants under the treaty.[1]. The principal beneficiaries of territorial adjustment were Romania, Czechoslovakia, and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. The treaty was signed on June 4, 1920, at the Grand Trianon Palace in Versailles, France.

1944 - Forward

          Axis occupation ended in 1944 and the region was temporarily placed under military administration (1944–1945) run by the new communist authorities. During, and after the military administration, thousands of people were killed, interned, arrested, violate, tortured or expelled - this affected most of the German and Hungarian population.

          The region was politically restored in 1945 as an autonomous province of Serbia (incorporating Syrmia, Banat, and Bačka). Instead of the previous name (Danube Banovina), the region regained its historical name of Vojvodina, while its capital city remained Novi Sad.

          Under the rule of the Serbian president Slobodan Milošević, Vojvodina and Kosovo lost most of their autonomy in September 1990. Vojvodina was still referred to as an autonomous province of Serbia, but most of its autonomous powers - including, crucially, its vote on the Yugoslav collective presidency - were transferred to the control of Belgrade. The province, however, still had its own parliament and government and some other autonomous functions as well.

          After the fall of Milošević in 2000 a new reform was needed in Vojvodina, as the statute of the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina is from 1991 and has been deemed by the Serbian Parliament as outdated. The Vojvodina provincial assembly adopted a new statute on 15 October 2008, partly amended, was approved by Parliament of Serbia on 30 November 2009. The Statute was officially proclaimed on 14 December 2009, in Novi Sad, and came into force on 1 January 2010.

          After a constitution of Serbia from 1992, Vojvodina is divided into seven districts, which are called after its main geographical location. Districts are named after the main region which district covers. Minister of Local Government, in the Serbian Government appoints commissioners of the districts, but they have no political power. Local government lies in municipalities and cites. The seven districts are further subdivided into 43 municipalities and the cities of Novi Sad and Subotica.

Vojvodina Districts & Municipalities

District
(Bačka: Serbo-Croatian)
District seat with city status Municipalities
Central Banat Zrenjanin Novi Bečej, Nova Crnja, Sečanj, Žitište 
North Bačka Subotica Bačka Topola, Mali Iđoš
North Banat Kikinda Ada, Čoka, Kanjiža, Kikinda, Novi Kneževac, Senta
South Bačka Novi Sad Bač, Bačka Palanka, Bački Petrovac, Bečej, Beočin, Vrbas, Srbobran, Sremski Karlovci, Temerin, Titel, Žabalj 
South Banat Pančevo Alibunar, Bela Crkva, Kovačica, Kovin, Opovo, Plandište, Vršac
Syrmia Sremska Mitrovica Inđija, Irig, Pećinci, Ruma, Šid, Stara Pazova
West Bačka Sombor Apatin, Kula, Odžaci
 

 

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 Last Updated: 18 May 2018

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